Clean Heart Ministries
Ministering: Repentance, Forgiveness, Cleansing and Love
 
 
 


Repentance

Psalm 51:10-17 (KJV)

10) Create in me a clean heart, O God; and renew a right spirit within me.
11) Cast me not away from thy presence; and take not thy holy spirit from me.
12) Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation; and uphold me with thy free spirit.
13) Then will I teach transgressors thy ways; and sinners shall be converted unto thee.
14) Deliver me from bloodguiltiness, O God, thou God of my salvation: and my tongue shall sing aloud of thy righteousness.
15) O Lord, open thou my lips; and my mouth shall show forth thy praise.
16) For thou desirest not sacrifice; else would I give it: thou delightest not in burnt offering.
17) The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.

 

Introduction:

This page will cover detailed study of the concept of Biblical repentance. We are currently formatting the information we have into a web friendly version but for now give you the Easton's Bible Dictionary definition of repentance. More will follow ...


Repentance as defined in Easton's Bible Dictionary:


There are three Greek words used in the New Testament to denote repentance.

(1) The verb metamelomai is used of a change of mind, such as to produce regret or even remorse on account of sin, but not necessarily a change of heart. This word is used with reference to the repentance of Judas (Mt 27:3).
(2) Metanoeo, meaning to change one's mind and purpose, as the result of after knowledge. This verb, with (3) the cognate noun metanoia, is used of true repentance, a change of mind and purpose and life, to which remission of sin is promised.

Evangelical repentance consists of
(1) a true sense of one's own guilt and sinfulness;
(2) an apprehension of God's mercy in Christ;
(3) an actual hatred of sin (Ps 119:128; Job 42:5,6; 2Co 7:10) and turning from it to God; and
(4) a persistent endeavour after a holy life in a walking with God in the way of his commandments.

The true penitent is conscious of guilt (Ps 51:4,9), of pollution (51:5, 7, 10), and of helplessness (51:11; 109:21, 22). Thus he apprehends himself to be just what God has always seen him to be and declares him to be. But repentance comprehends not only such a sense of sin, but also an apprehension of mercy, without which there can be no true repentance (Ps 51:1; 130:4).

 

 

 

 Page last updated: 27 June 2012

 Home   Disclaimer Privacy Policy Copyright 2018